World's Largest NO-KILL
Animal Rescue
and Adoption Organization
 
 

 

Members get our updates on rescue alerts, league events, special offers and more.

sign up!

animal

Facebook YouTube Twitter
    

Like us on Facebook  
Like us on Facebook  
| Share share | email | print | A A

Search Advice

Search for:
Hint: Use * for wildcard, e.g. “adopt*” will return results matching both “adoption” and “adopting”
animal

Planned giving Q&As

Great tips and advice from the Animal League Experts.

Below are Q&As on planned giving that relate to cats or dogs. Not what you're looking for? Use the form below to change your criteria, or submit your question to one of our experts.

animal
Categories
experts
 
How can planned gifts help the Animal League?
Q:

How can planned gifts help the Animal League?

A:

Planned gifts are a wonderful way to make a substantial gift to support causes you hold dear, including, we hope, North Shore Animal League America. We rely on the support of animal lovers like you. The costs associated with operating the world's largest no-kill shelter are tremendous. Because we believe that every life is precious, we commit ourselves to providing each and every animal in our care with the help it needs. Our services range from bottle-feeding the newborns to having veterinarians on staff to facilitate heart scans, surgeries, x-rays as well as overseeing facilities to isolate and treat animals with communicable diseases. We are dedicated to providing the finest care in our state-of-the-art facilities that we believe every animal deserves. To attract adopters for older dogs and cats, we offer free check-ups for senior pets adopted by senior citizens. We operate seven mobile units that transport our dogs, cats, kittens and puppies rescued from kill shelters and take them to off-site adoption events where they have the chance to be adopted into forever homes. Our committed staff and volunteers make this all happen, day to day, year to year, nurturing and caring for each and every animal in our charge. Your planned gift means that we can continue to provide this attention to homeless dogs, cats, kittens and puppies far into the future.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
What Is A Planned Gift?
Q:

What is a planned gift?

A:

A planned gift is a gift that will take effect at a later time, usually at your death. It can take the form of:

  • a bequest in a will or trust,
  • a beneficiary designation of an insurance policy or retirement plan,
  • a transfer on death designation of a bank or securities account,
  • a charitable remainder trust, or
  • a charitable gift annuity.

Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
Why Have a Trust?
Q:

Why have a trust?

A:

Trusts have many uses. They include:

  • Protecting the assets of minors or other persons who would have difficulty handling the assets
  • Protecting your own assets in the event you become disabled. You could create a trust naming a third party, such as a child or financial institution as a trustee. Or, you could be the trustee of your trust and provide for a successor trustee to take over in the event you become incapacitated.
  • Avoiding probate. Probate is necessary in most states in order to transfer ownership of assets owned by a deceased person to the rightful beneficiaries. If all of your assets are in a trust, your death doesn?t change the ownership, so no probate is required.? This frequently means that your estate plan is more private and the costs associated with your death will be reduced.
  • Providing benefits to both a charity and an individual. For example, through a charitable trust, you could provide that income is payable to you and your spouse during life, and on your death, the remainder of the trust goes to charity. Or, you could provide that a charity gets the income for a certain number of years, and then your children take the remainder.
  • Providing for your pet. Most states now allow for a trust to be established for the care of a pet.

Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
What is a Trust?
Q:

What is a Trust?

A:

A trust is created when someone (the "trustee") holds property for the benefit of another. For example, I could transfer stock to another person with instructions to hold the stock as I direct and pay it to the person or persons I direct under the conditions I set forth. There are many different types of trusts. The ones most relevant to planned giving are living (or "intervivos" trusts) and testamentary trusts. Trusts can be revocable or irrevocable (meaning that you can revoke the trust, or not).

Living trusts are trusts that take effect during your lifetime. For example, you could create a trust, name yourself or another as trustee, and direct how the property is to be distributed both during your lifetime and then on your death. If the trust is revocable, you can change the terms at any time and even revoke it during your lifetime. If the trust is irrevocable, you are generally not allowed to change it or revoke it. You can be the trustee of your own trust and name a successor to serve if you resign, become incapacitated or die. Your trust can be for your benefit during your lifetime and then provide for the beneficiaries on your death.

Testamentary trusts are trusts that take effect on death. A trust established by a will is a testamentary trust. For example, your will could provide that certain amounts are to be paid to your child, but as long as your child is under the age of 25, the assets are paid to a third person as trustee to be invested and paid out for the benefit of your child, as you direct in your will.

Charitable trusts can be either living trusts or testamentary trusts. In order to receive a charitable deduction, the trust must be irrevocable, and if an individual is also a beneficiary, the trust must meet certain requirements.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
What Should My Will Contain?
Q:

What Should My Will Contain?

A:

Over the years of advising clients, with respect to their own wills, I have come to believe that a will should reflect who you are. For example, I am a mother and a grandmother, and I want to include my family as beneficiaries. But I have also been involved with some wonderful organizations over my lifetime, and I want to remember them. And, there have been some causes that have been very important to me. So my will provides for my family, those organizations to which I gave my time, and two very important causes that helped shaped my life. One of those causes is animal welfare, and what better way to further that cause than to give a gift to North Shore Animal League America, the world's largest no-kill shelter. It gives me great joy to know that long after I am gone, with my help those future little homeless puppies and kitties (and their big brothers and sisters) will have a chance to live and flourish through the loving work of all the folks at North Shore Animal League America.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
How Do I Get a Will?
Q:

How do I get a will?

A:

See a lawyer! Each state has its own (sometimes very strict) requirements for what makes a valid will and how to amend a will. You want to be sure that your will is effective, so you should have it done professionally.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
Can I Provide a Gift From My Trust to the Animal League?
Q:

How can I provide a gift from my trust to North Shore Animal League America?

A:

Here is sample language you can share with your lawyer:

On my death my Trustee shall pay to NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE AMERICA, Federal I.D. No. 11-1666852, 16 Lewyt Street, Port Washington, New York, 11050, [the sum of $_____] or [all or ___% of the residue of my trust estate], to be used for its general purposes.

By making a gift from your trust, you will have the satisfaction of knowing that animals will be helped by your love and generosity even after your death.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
Who Should Be The Trustee?
Q:

Who should be the trustee?

A:

Depending on the type of trust, you can be the trustee during your lifetime. You may want to name a spouse or a child or a financial institution to serve as successor trustee or as the original trustee. You may have more than one person serve as trustee. Being a trustee is a big responsibility so you should discuss this with the person you want to serve and with your attorney.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
How Do I Bequest to the Animal League?
Q:

How can I provide a bequest in my will to North Shore Animal League America?

A:

Here is sample language you can share with your lawyer:

I give NORTH SHORE ANIMAL LEAGUE AMERICA, Federal I.D. No. 11-1666852, 16 Lewyt Street, Port Washington, New York, 11050, [the sum of $_____] or [all or ___% of the residue of my estate], to be used for its general purposes.

By making a bequest in your will, you will have the satisfaction of knowing that animals will be helped by your love and generosity even after your death.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
How Do I Establish A Trust?
Q:

How should I establish a trust?

A:

See a lawyer! State laws vary and the IRS has strict requirements for certain kinds of trusts such as charitable trusts.


Submitted by anonymous
Answered by Planned Giving Expert
Items 1 - 10 of 11  12Next

 

Browse our extensive expert advice by selecting categories below:

Show Expert Advice by Topic

Animal:
Topic:
Advice Type: