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Meet Cesar Millan

World-renowned Dog Coach and host of the National Geographic Channel series, The Dog Whisperer, Cesar Millan provides tips that help you be the best pet parent. 

Cesar Millan is a strong advocate for shelter animals and the Millan Foundation supports shelter and rescue groups nationwide.

 

 

Browse Cesar's Q&As:

How do I prevent relocation trauma?
Q:

I’m going to be moving soon, taking my 11-year-old female Border Collie and 10-year-old Blue Heeler-Australian Shepherd male from where they’ve lived with me in a small community all their lives, to the big city of Seattle. I will be living with friends temporarily—they have two cats and a backyard—before we move to something smaller, quite possibly an apartment or condo. My Border Collie is quiet and easily managed; my male dog is hyper, protective of me, has a few separation issues, and is sometimes aggressive toward strangers. How can I ease the transition from their familiar routine to something so completely different? I’ll make sure we see the vet before we move, and I know I should bring along and keep consistent their bedding, food, and exercise routine, etc. My Border Collie has some arthritis and cataracts, but otherwise both dogs are in good health.

A:

First, we need to dissect the idea of health. While your dogs may be okay physically, your male dog’s aggressive behavior is adversely affecting the mental health of your entire family. I see this move as a real opportunity for you—since unfamiliar territory will create the kind of temporary uncertainty needed to establish a fresh set of rules and boundaries. If you can swing it financially, I’d advise you not to bring any of your dogs’ old paraphernalia, since without it, you can create new associations and, as a result, new behaviors. I don’t know if you put a backpack on your Blue Heeler mix when you walk him, but if you don’t, I’d start now. And I’d also use this as an opportunity to claim my own interior space; for more on this, read the chapter about “proximity” in my book, How to Raise the Perfect Dog.

One thing I do when I need to make change happen is draw a rectangle, and inside it, I write down five things that I want: “I want total discipline”; “I want to be out of this apartment in three months”; “I want a great job,” etc. I keep it simple; I don’t overthink it, I just feel it. Spiritually, in our DNA, we all know what we want but when we think too much, we dilute that sense of certainty. What works for me is writing about my wishes for my whole life, not just my wishes for my dogs—because the manifestation of getting the other things that I want will be a great relationship with my dogs. While Dog Whisperer’s episodes are planned, the show itself—its insistence on striving for calm-assertive energy—came completely from a feeling, one that was at the very root of who I am.


Submitted by Chere
Answered by Cesar Milan
Is she imitating her elders?
Q:

We have two Mini-Schnauzers: Hudson, six years old, and Molly, 18 months. The minute Molly arrived, Hudson began snarling, barking, and pulling at other dogs when I’d take him and Molly out walking—and his high-pitched squeak-and-bark combo sometimes scares people. Worst of all, though, whenever Hudson gets rowdy, Molly immediately begins imitating him (it seems she’s trying to act like a big dog, even though she’s considerably smaller)—and she always has to have the last bark. They ignore my efforts to calm them down, and it isn’t until the other dog has finally passed that the two of them continue their walk as though nothing has happened. Any ideas?

A:

Respectfully, when I hear phrases like “trying to act like a big dog” or “needing to have the last bark,” it’s obvious to me that you are humanizing your dog—a tendency many people have when their dogs aren’t behaving the way they want them to. What they’re not comprehending, though, is that in order to really understand our dogs, we have to first honor them as dogs. It’s important that you learn to view your dog in this order: 1) animal; 2) dog; 3) breed; and, 4) name. Even with my own dogs, I call them by name only when they’re in a calm-submissive state; I don’t think it’s fair to use their names when they’re misbehaving. I’d suggest you read my second book, Be the Pack Leader. It’s all about taking charge, which, in effect, amounts to honoring the identity of your dog. Once you’ve mastered that, the rest will fall into place.


Submitted by Ron
Answered by Cesar Milan
She doesn’t bark - she cringes!
Q:

My 18-month-old female Lab-Terrier mix is very smart and doesn’t have a mean bone in her body. She is, however, a bit skittish. When she was about eight months old, a large sign fell on her when we were walking down a busy street, and ever since, she’s been nervous around anything that looms over her (she’s only 35 pounds, so that’s just about everything). I’m a firm but affectionate owner, and I don’t baby her, but I feel bad that she gets so worked up. What can I do to help?

A:

It’s very important that you understand that our dogs react to events—and to objects—based on how we nurture their reactions. People often tell me that they’re firm with a dog, but that doesn’t really tell me they aren’t also feeling bad about what they think the dog is going through—and transmitting that feeling directly to the dog through their energy. My advice would be to make two lists: one, of the things that you think are bothering your dog; and the other, of the things that are bothering you. The idea that “everything” is bigger than your dog and is therefore frightening her is really just a story you’re telling yourself, and the lists will help you separate the story from the reality. Once you’ve done that, you can begin taking control of how you’re behaving around your dog.

The first step, I think, would be to quietly observe her when she’s near one of those big objects (like the sign), and pay close attention to what’s really happening. Make sure you’re keeping your own reaction neutral, rather than seeming in any way anxious or apologetic. You might even try bringing another dog along and comparing her reaction to your dog’s. In dealing with our dogs, just as in dealing with life, blaming the leaf—or whatever it is that falls—is equivalent to making a thing responsible, when it’s always our reactions to things that determine our fate.


Submitted by Boris
Answered by Cesar Milan
What is Spaniel Rage?
Q:

We recently got two adorable English Springer Spaniel puppies, and just this morning we heard about something called “English Springer Spaniel Rage Syndrome.” Have you ever heard of this? I truly hope we don’t have to deal with something that sounds so potentially awful!

A:

Spaniel Rage is real; it’s biological, and caused by bad breeding practices. It’s one of the reasons I’m such an advocate for the idea that only people with good ethics should become dog breeders; and why I’m so determined to abolish puppy mills. Unfortunately, Spaniel Rage—characterized by vicious, unprovoked behavior—is a condition I can’t rehabilitate. Like a panic attack, anything at all can trigger it, and medication is the only treatment. Sad as it is, I thank you for sending this question. Hopefully, it will help people understand the importance of spaying and neutering, and remind them of another positive aspect of adopting a mixed-breed dog—mixed breeds rarely display unprovoked rage.


Submitted by The Joneses
Answered by Cesar Milan
My Poodle mix seems to "freeze"
Q:

I recently adopted a wonderful little dog. Not sure what his age or breed-type is—my best guess is Poodle-Maltese mix—but often when we’re out walking, he sits down and refuses to budge. Sometimes he’ll do this if we’re heading home too quickly, but it’s often for no reason at all. He’ll occasionally respond if I pull his leash sharply, but most of the time I have to pick him up. Any advice?

A:

Your question began with your trying to figure out what breed your dog is, which, in my opinion, is not the ideal approach. When people are preoccupied with breed, it tells me they believe the dog’s behavior is linked to breed; and when a dog picks up on this conversation—this idea that you don’t really know who he is—he feels disoriented, and it becomes hard for him to trust you. Being a leader who instills confidence comes down to providing protection and direction—but instead of feeling secure, your dog is sensing that you don’t know how to deal. Instead of focusing on breed, learn to see your dog as body language and energy. When your actions say, “I don’t know what you are,” you’re manifesting doubt in all areas of your dog’s life. Like in any significant relationship, the message should be, “I love who you are; I know what you need.” And sometimes, you just have to wait. Being supportive means learning to live with uncertainty. Once your dog senses that you’ve learned, his self-esteem will increase and his nervous behavior will dissipate.


Submitted by Gillian
Answered by Cesar Milan
Girl-Crazy Chihuahua
Q:

Cesar, my dog is obsessed...My Chihuahua, Bean, an unneutered male, becomes obsessed with every female dog he comes in contact with. Size or breed doesn’t matter; if no one stops him, he’ll just keep his nose planted in the other dog’s butt for hours at a time—and whatever he isn’t sniffing, he’s humping! I work at a dog-boarding kennel and take Bean there at least once a week to ensure he gets to mingle with six or seven other dogs his own size. But while he does great with the pack, as soon as he gets home, he’s back to being... Himself. I think my dad’s refusal to get Bean fixed has contributed to the obsessive behavior. He says he doesn’t want to take Bean’s “manhood” away, and also seems to think Bean’s antics are cute. I’ve even noticed that Bean behaves better when my dad isn’t around. What am I supposed to do?

A:

This is a situation where the dog’s behavior can’t be modified because the human in charge is in denial. Your dad’s belief that your dog will lose his manhood is erroneous. My dogs are all spayed or neutered, including Junior—my right hand—and he’s lost nothing. Your father needs to consider that when you deprive an unneutered male dog of the sexual release he craves, you’re adding stress to his life, and his behavior will reflect that. There’s also evidence that neutering significantly reduces a dog’s chance of developing testicular or prostate cancer. So on top of everything else, when you look at the cost of treating cancer, versus the relatively low cost of neutering, the decision to neuter makes sense economically as well. Respectfully, your dad’s lack of knowledge is causing him to behave selfishly. I’m trying to provide him with a different viewpoint—and please write back and let me know if he changes his mind. If he does, I’d love to take him out to dinner, or for a beer or a glass of wine—whatever he’d like. I’m not kidding!


Submitted by Angie
Answered by Cesar Milan
Why won’t he eat?
Q:

I’m a professional basketball player from Croatia with a big, big love of dogs. I also love your show and always follow your rule about exercise, discipline, and then affection. When I see how eagerly your dogs eat, though, I get mad, because mine is so picky I wind up throwing a lot of his food in the trash. First I thought he didn’t like what I was feeding him, so I changed it several times—but I always have to come up with a different trick to make him eat it. Sometimes I don’t even have time to put the food on the floor and he’ll scarf it all down, and some days when I serve it to him, he just smells it and turns away. Do you think that because he’s an only dog, he knows nobody will steal his food, and so he just doesn’t bother about it? I know he’s in good health. What can I do to get him to do to stop being so wasteful?

A:

Whether you’re talking about a dog in a single- or multiple-dog household, if he’s hungry, he’ll eat. A dog, however, can actually sense his owner’s obsessions and will tune in to the type of energy you’re projecting when you feed him. What are your thoughts when you’re putting out his food? If they’re anxious and negative, rather than calm and positive, you need to work at changing them. Instead of fearing your dog won’t eat and resenting the idea of throwing away all that food, envision him happily savoring every bite.

To stimulate hunger, you might try letting him fast for a day; this spurs a natural cleansing process in which all stored body fat becomes food. Once that’s happened, your dog’s appetite will kick in.


Submitted by Duby
Answered by Cesar Milan
Do my pups Pine When I’m Away?
Q:

How do you think dogs handle it psychologically when their owners go on vacation? I live in Montana and have access to hundreds of acres, a pond, and a lake, and my dogs and I are together a lot. We hire dogsitters, but they can’t spend the kind of time with my dogs that I do, and I envision them pining away and becoming really anxious when no one’s around. I know the minute they see suitcases, they sense their routine will change, but how traumatic do you really think this is for them?

A:

I need to be very honest with you. Going on vacation will be as traumatic for your dogs as you want it to be. We attach our own stories to our realities, and our dogs intuit them and evolve accordingly. To keep from feeling bad about leaving—and having your dogs pick up on your guilty energy—try dragging your luggage out when you’re not leaving; that way, the action is part of your 24/7 reality, rather than an occasion for feeling crummy. Also, ask your dog’s sitter to take an unwashed piece of your clothing—a T-shirt, say—and tuck it into his back pocket. The smellier and sweatier, the better! The only thing your sitter can’t imitate is your scent—and that’s what your dogs miss. Finally, rather than urging sitters to mimic your behavior, get your dogs to see them as “the adventure people.” All dogs need is a new place to explore—a different block or field from the one they’re used to—and suddenly, they’re in Disneyland! Once they’re presented with a new challenge, there are no worries.


Submitted by Paula
Answered by Cesar Milan
What’s with all the food dragging?
Q:

Georgia, my two-and-a-half year-old spayed female Maltese, takes one piece of food at a time from her bowl and then walks around with it before eating it; or she’ll take it to the rug in the family room and eat it there. Sometimes she puts it on the rug and goes back and forth, up to the food and then away from it, touching it with her nose before finally picking it up and eating it. What’s up?

A:

Your dog is exhibiting the kind of beautiful, instinctive behavior that we rarely see in modern dogs. The urge to move food with her nose—what she’s doing is burying it—is encoded in her DNA. If she were living in the wild, this is how she would save food for later. Since she’s inside the house, though, the rug seems to hold more burying possibilities than a wood floor or linoleum, and that’s why she has chosen it. I love to see this kind of behavior!


Submitted by Donna
Answered by Cesar Milan
Charlie’s training didn’t take!
Q:

I’m a trainer, and my client’s Border Collie, Charlie, won’t stop barking. My client’s husband—who was very close to the dog—died suddenly of a heart attack, and afterward there were a lot of visitors in the house. I sensed that Charlie’s barking was caused by his owner tensing up in anticipation of how Charlie would behave when a guest arrived, and I temporarily solved the problem by getting the owner to relax, putting Charlie in a sit, and then, when everyone was feeling calm, asking guests to come in or giving them the go-ahead to depart. It worked, but since the owner doesn’t have many guests these days, the training didn’t take, and Charlie’s back at square one. What next?

A:

This is a case where a simple, logical approach is your best bet. Charlie’s life has changed, but not for the better, and it seems that people may be focusing on what they want, rather than on Charlie’s needs. Is he walking? Being challenged? Is he undergoing agility training? Does his everyday life have structure to it? Unwanted behavior disappears when wanted behavior emerges. If Charlie’s owner is in an emotional crisis, as anyone would be after the death of a spouse, it’s possible she’s not tuning in to Charlie’s needs. And the truth is, if we want our dogs to respect us, we need to respect them. Charlie is just manifesting what’s missing in his own life. My hope is that working to build a structured life for Charlie will help his owner work through some of her own grief as well.


Submitted by Sharon
Answered by Cesar Milan
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